Direct Shipment & Compliance

Holiday Cheer in the Direct-to-Consumer Wine Shipping Channel

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Thu, 12/13/2018 - 15:25

The holiday season is known for the warmth and generosity it inspires in people, but it’s also an incredibly important time of year for wineries. December is a busy month for most companies in business-to-consumer industries due to the holiday rush, and the direct-to-consumer (DtC) wine shipping channel is no different. October, November, and December have historically been among the strongest-performing months of the year for DtC shipments, both in terms of value and volume.

In fact, these three months have seen nearly 40 percent of the total annual value in the DtC channel in both 2016 (39 percent) and 2017 (38.4 percent), despite only making up one quarter of the calendar year. Likewise, the volume of DtC shipments has traditionally been stronger in the fall. In 2016, about 36 percent of sales for the year fell between October and the end of December, a number that dipped by less than half a percentage point in 2017.

Stay tuned for our upcoming 2019 Direct to Consumer Wine Shipping Report, set to be released in mid-January, for insights on how the DtC channel performed this year in comparison.

 

What’s the outlook for holiday DtC wine shipping?

The cause of the surge in sales during autumn is generally due to consumers stocking up on booze in advance of – and during – the holiday season in preparation of parties and big events. This works out well for many wineries, timing-wise, as harvesting tends to slow toward the end of the summer and they can focus their internal resources on preparing for the big holiday swoon.

With more states passing legislation to embrace the direct-to-consumer channel each year, wine producers can look forward to continued growth across the country. Pennsylvania legalized DtC wine shipping two years ago and exploded on the scene last year with a 158 percent increase in shipments.

But the Keystone state wasn’t finished; our midyear data showed a further 44 percent uptick in sales to Pennsylvania consumers through the first six months of 2018. These numbers figure to be even more impressive after the high-volume holiday season comes to a close.

 

How can my winery prepare to grow in the DtC channel?

It’s unreasonable to expect each state that authorizes DtC shipping to immediately become fertile destinations like Pennsylvania has, and only a handful of states that do not allow DtC shipping remain. But this year-over-year growth in that state demonstrates consistent upward trajectory in the channel. Remember, DtC wine shipping has only been legal anywhere in the United States since the famed Granholm decision of 2005, so this channel remains a relatively new market that has yet to realize its full potential.

Wineries can expect residents of established DtC states and newer DtC states alike to continue buying wine via this channel in exponentially greater volumes. It may make sense for your winery to consider expanding sales into new states. To navigate the different rules and regulations in each state and ensure you are in compliance when branching out, head over to our Direct-to-Consumer Wine Shipping Rules tool.

 

 

See for yourself how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your winery stay on top of compliance for your DtC shipping efforts. Re quest a demo today.

 

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BevAlc Roundup | Will the Illinois Lebamoff case affect Tennessee Wine and Spirits, new AVAs in California, and how Prohibition shaped today’s wine country

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Tue, 12/11/2018 - 11:49

Now is the time of year when we look back and recap what happened in the past months and take stock of what went well and what we can improve for next year. Speaking of which, in this Roundup, we have the TTB looking forward to rule changes for labeling and advertising regulations (and wanting your input!); then we preview the outlook for smaller wineries in the years to come, which experts expect to darken; and finally, looking back, we see what were the top beers from 2018. And, regarding end-of-year wrap ups, don’t forget to tune in to the ShipCompliant by Sovos annual Virtual Webinar, on December 12 (or catch it later when we post it next week)!

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the Sovos/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

 

Regulatory News and Discussions

TTB Newsletter | This week’s top news includes an offer in compromise accepted from Eagle Brands from a trade practice investigation, posting of the presentations used during our recent malt beverage and distilled spirits labeling webinars, publication of three rulemaking documents related to American viticultural areas, and request for comments on TTB information collections. TTB

New Rulemaking is the Next Step in Our Labeling Program Modernization | The TTB announces the publication of a rulemaking document in the Federal Register to propose updates, simplifications, and clarifications in the labeling and advertising regulations for wine, distilled spirits, and malt beverages. TTB

Reading the Tea Leaves on the Lebamoff Decision | The Lebamoff case out of the 7th Circuit was a strongly written opinion by Chief Judge Diane Wood to influence the Supreme Court’s direction in the upcoming Tennessee Wine case. Irish Liquor Lawyer

Supreme Court Sets Oral Argument in the Tennessee Retailers Case for January 16, 2019 | A showdown for retailers arguing against discriminatory state laws gets set for mid-January as briefs for the petitioners are filed. Alcohol Law Review

Florida the Latest Battleground for Interstate Shipping | A Florida legal declaration seeks to open the state up to the auction and retail market. Wine-searcher.com

USDA Purchases More Than $10 Million in California Table Grapes | California table grapes were included in the USDA Food Purchasing Program for the first time as part of the mitigation program because of the 53% tariff imposed on U.S. grapes by China. The Sentinel

 

Industry Updates: Market Conditions and Developments

Gloomy Outlook for Smaller Wineries | Storm clouds are gathering over Northern California’s hundreds of small wineries. Wine-searcher.com

The Latest Trends in Wine as Seen By Global Execs | Sopexa, the international marketing and communication agency with a special emphasis on food and drink, has released its 2018 Wine Trade Monitor. Forbes

8 New California AVAs on the Horizon | What you need to know about the Golden State’s new appellations. SevenFifty Daily

Think Millennials are a Tricky Bunch? Meet Generation Z…. | After 15 years on center stage, Millennials are about to have to share the spotlight with a new generation whose arrival will rock the consumer scene. Beverage Media Group

 

Digestif

How Prohibition Shaped American Wine Country | If Prohibition never happened, could Missouri have been Napa? We take an in-depth look at how the 18th amendment changed wine the U.S., who survived, and how. Wine Enthusiast

Scotch Whisky v. American Whiskey: Who Won 2018? | Before the fanatics rise up against the statement, this article is not based on flavour or craft. Forbes

The 50 Best Beers of 2018 | Our favorites span light and salty goses made in tanker trucks, to complex, barrel-aged-and-blended wild ales made using coolships and SPain’s ancient solera method. VinePair

Wine Institute Launches Mobile Version of DiscoverCaliforniaWines.com | The website is available for the U.S. and customized for top export markets in nine localized and foreign language versions. Wine Business

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

 

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BevAlc Roundup | TTB Crackdown on Consignment Sales, Whither American Whiskey, and the Six Types of American Wine Drinkers

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 11/26/2018 - 10:42

The holiday season can so often end up filled with chaos and stress that it distracts from the reasons we value this time of year — as a chance to reflect on those we love and care about and everything that brings us joy. And so, as we prepare for a period of busy sales and hectic shipping, we at ShipCompliant by Sovos want to extend our deepest gratitude to our clients, our partners, our friends who all together strive everyday to make each other’s lives better and further this wonderful industry we share. Thank you all so much, and we hope you all had a lovely Thanksgiving holiday!

For this week’s Roundup we look at the Amicus briefs filed before the Supreme Court in favor of the position of the Tennessee Wine and Spirit Retailer’s Association — this will surely capture a lot of attention in the months ahead; if you are an interested party, look around for ways you can get your voice in front of the Court. Speaking of which, this week’s Roundup also has a report on a citizen’s action to file an Amicus, which anyone in favor of expanding the consumer’s interests can subscribe to. We then look at some end-of-year reports for the wine and beer markets, see how tariffs are affecting the bourbon industry, and take a more nuanced look at what trade and market forces actually affect sales of U.S. wine in France.

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the Sovos/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

 

Regulatory News and Discussions

TTB Newsletter | This special edition of the TTB Newsletter announces that we have published rulemaking designed to significantly update and improve the alcohol advertising and label regulations, which is a part of our strategic goal to modernize our labeling program. TTB

Fourteen Briefs Filed in Support of Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Association’s Appeal to the Supreme Court | These parties both supported the positions of the Tennessee Retailers, and offered other perspectives to paint a more complete story for the Supreme Court’s consideration. Alcohol Law Review

Wine Consumers to Fund Supreme Court Brief on Wine Shipping Case | A GoFundMe Campaign has been launched that gives wine consumer across the country the opportunity to help fund a “Friend of the Court” Amicus brief in the upcoming Byrd v. Tennessee Supreme Court case. Wine Industry Advisor

TTB Imposes One-Day Suspensions on Napa Valley Wine Companies Over ALleged Illegal Consignment Sales | The suspension of the winery and three other wine companies stems from a joint operation TTP conducted with the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control in March. Wine Business

California Winer to Change Labels for Oregon Brands | A Napa Valley winery at the center of a labeling dispute in Oregon has agreed to put new labels on two brands of Oregon Pinot noir, including Elouan and The Willametter Journal. Capital Press

Wineries Run Afoul of Obscure Law | An arcane part of the Americans with Disabilities Act is causing headaches for some producers. Wine-searcher.com

New U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Deal Could Open up B.C. Grocery Stornes to Washington Wine Sales | Washington winemakers have chafed for years over the unequal treatment their bottles receive in grocery stores in British Columbia. Spokesman

 

Industry Updates: Market Conditions and Developments

2018 U.S. Wine Sales Are Up, Especially Red Wine Shipped Direct | The U.S. wine market is both up and in the red — red wine, that is. Forbes

As US Beer Shipments Decline, Off-Premise Sales Remain Flat | Shipments of domestically brewed beer are down about 2.9 percent, according to the Beer Institute, but year-to-date volume sales at off-premise retailers are still basically flat. Brewbound

Craft Bourbon Craze Is Over in Europe Thanks to 25% Import Tax | Europe had been blossoming as a source of new revenue — but this market has been effectively cut off for producers that lack the clout or brand recognition of titans like Brown-Forman Corp. and Diageo Plc. Bloomberg

Planning for the Future of American Whiskey | Distillers discuss strategies for keeping up with market demand, forecasting sales, and driving growth. SevenFifty Daily

Sustainability Produces Good Small Winery Financial Performance, Says a Recent Study | Reported last month in Science Daily, a comprehensive study that stretched from the U.S. to Europe points to financial success when small-to-medium-sized (SME) wineries follow sustainable viticultural and winemaking practices. Forbes

 

Digestif

Trump’s Right — It’s Harder to Sell U.S. Wine in France. Tarifs Aren’t the Whole Story | “American makes some good wines, but we have everything we need here in France.” Bloomberg

US Wine Drinkers Defined in Six Segments | US drinkers are changing their behaviour towards the wine category, the US Portraits 2018 from Wine Intelligence has revealed. Harpers

Is Less Really More for Wine Labels? | Wine labels have a habit of being dense and over-complicated. Wine-searcher.com

Cocktails At Kroger? Why Supermarket Bars Are Going National | Shopping drives most of us to drink, it seems; and savvy grocery chains figure they might as well capture those dollars by turning supermarkets into destinations for excellent craft beer and wine. VinePair

 

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

 

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TTB Issues Circular Regarding Trade Practice Guidelines

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 11/12/2018 - 16:02

One of the biggest news stories in the beverage alcohol industry over the last year or two has been the intensified enforcement of trade practice violations by the federal Trade and Tax Bureau (TTB).

An industry circular posted by the TTB on Friday, November 8, 2018 points to the agency’s current engagement with this trend of enforcement, and provides all beverage alcohol suppliers and wholesalers guidance on what activities they should avoid in order to remain in compliance with federal rules. Increased enforcement has been a developing topic since early 2017, when the TTB first received an additional $5 million in appropriations from Congress to expand its investigations activities. For the TTB, trade practices violations were seen as a critical area of rules and regulations that required intensified education and enforcement.

As the circular indicates, despite these increased efforts by the TTB, the agency continues to see “significant and widespread” violations of trade practice rules. According to the circular, the violations that it sees includes such activities as (quoted from the circular, but not a complete list) :

  • Industry members paying fees or providing other things of value to retailers in exchange for display space or shelf space (including designated tap space), commonly referred to as slotting fees.  In some cases, such payments are hidden in the company’s books as payments for samplings that never take place.
  • Industry members and retailers altering invoices in an effort to conceal the nature of inducement payments.
  • Industry members and retailers altering invoices in an effort to conceal the nature of inducement payments.
  • Industry members illegally operating without a valid Federal permit due to not timely reporting changes of ownership, management, or control over their operations.

Trade practice rules are intended to create fair competition and equal access within the beverage alcohol industry. They prevent certain actors from using their established wealth and presence in the market from getting unfair edge over other members of the industry. As the circular says, “[The TTB] believe[s] that the industry as a whole has the ability and desire to operate within the law.“

The circular includes encouragement for industry members to undergo a voluntary disclosure with the TTB for any violations the industry member may have committed. By voluntarily disclosing, an industry member will mitigate whatever action the TTB may take against them for the violation.

The TTB takes its role in enforcing trade practice violations seriously, especially with the additional resources it has had in recent years to engage in enforcement actions. Industry members would do well to also take the TTB’s actions seriously and ensure that they remain in compliance with the federal rules that govern their license.

We at ShipCompliant by Sovos recommend everyone to read this circular and review the federal (and relevant state!) rules regarding trade practice, and take any necessary action to get compliant and stay compliant.

 

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

 

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BevAlc Roundup | ADA Compliance for Winery Websites, Pabst and MillerCoors Clash, and Southern Oregon Wineries Blend Tradition and Modernization

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 11/12/2018 - 15:39

For the second year in a row, this season — the post-harvest and pre-holiday time — is being marked by devastating wildfires in both North and South California. While this year’s conflagrations have not directly affected wine country as last year’s did, the fires’ toll does not occur in isolation. Everyone is impacted when communities are reduced to ashes, when our friends and neighbors suffer. We at ShipCompliant by Sovos again extend our deepest sympathies to those who have been impacted so far, and fervently hope that the weather improves and those brave souls fighting the fires can turn the tide of ruin.

In this week’s Roundup, we look at a circular issued by the TTB cautioning the industry to review their Trade Practice compliance efforts in light of the agency’s continued enforcement actions, the Brewers Association mulls amending the definition of craft beer to incorporate more “non-traditional” styles, and has the Robert Parker rating system lost its sense of proportion or was 2016 just really great for wine?

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the Sovos/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

 

Regulatory News and Discussions

TTB Newsletter | Top stories includes two grape varieties that have been approved for use on American wine labels, information about service delays in our TTB call centers, an invitation to apply for the Assistant Director position in the Alcohol Labeling and Formulation Division, and another permit suspension resulting from a trade practice investigation. TTB

TTB Circular: Industry Compliance With Trade Practice Laws and Regulations | Since the beginning of its increased enforcement efforts, TTB has found significant violations of Federal trade practice laws and regulations by some members of the alcohol beverage industry. TTB

Winery Websites and ADA Compliance | The recent news of lawsuits filed against New York wineries has caused industry members to ask if they face any litigation risk if their websites are not accessible to people with disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”). JD Supra

Briefs Filed With 8th Circuit Urge Support of Missouri Tied House Law and Advertising Regulations | The State of Missouri has filed its brief and addendum appealing the district court decision to strike down on emIssouri tied house law and two alcohol advertising regulations. Alcohol Law Review

Wine, Consumers and the Court | There is no other category of consumer whose day to day commercial habits are more impacted by politics than wine consumers. Fermentation

 

Industry Updates: Market Conditions and Developments

Pabst Says MillerCoors Is Trying to Put it Out of Business | Pabst Brewing Company and MillerCoors are going to trial, with hipster favorite Pabst contending that MillerCoors wants to put it out of business by ending a longstanding partnership through which it brews Pabst’s beers. Washington Post

2018 Craft Beer Report: Craft Beer Market Experiencing Marginal Growth | IPAs make up nearly a quarter of the craft beer production industry, the largest shar for a single style by a fairly large margin. Beverage Industry

2019 DTC Wine Symposium Announces Workshop Sessions | Content to focus on case studies, practical recommendations. Wine Business

Jim Bernau Responds to Copper Cane’s Joe Wagner | The article regarding Oregon Vintners Pushing Back on Copper Cane’s Labels generated a lot of interest, as did last week’s Joe Wagner Responds: Copper Cane owner explains his side of the story, published by the Oregon Wine Press. Wine Business

Brewers Association Board Proposes New Craft Brewer Definition, Intends to Form Political Action Committee | The Brewers Association board of directors today informed members of proposed changes to its bylaws that would significantly alter the trade organization’s official craft brewer definition, and create a new voting member class. Brewbound

 

Digestif

Why So Many 2016 Napa 100-Point Wines? | None of these were given lightly or without careful consideration of the hallowed position they hold among all the other great wines of the world that have received the pinnacle of wine criticism accolades throughout our 40-year history of Robert Parker Wine Advocate. Robert Parker Wine Advocate

Old World Tradition and New World Innovation The Wines of Southern Oregon | From Peter Britt, who grew grapes in Jacksonville in 1855 to the establishment of the Rogue Valley Vintners in 2018, South Oregon’s wine industry has come a long way. JPR

How Millennials Made the Modern Somm | The role of sommelier has been redefined by a younger generation looking for adventure. wine-searcher.com

 

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

 

The post BevAlc Roundup | ADA Compliance for Winery Websites, Pabst and MillerCoors Clash, and Southern Oregon Wineries Blend Tradition and Modernization appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

BevAlc Roundup | A DtC Initiative in New Jersey, Brewers Say They’re Preparing for Climate Change, and New Grape Varieties Found in Chile

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 10/29/2018 - 18:48

Happy Halloween! We hope that everyone celebrates the fall season — the colorful leaves, the harvest, the night of spooks and treats — festively and safely. While you’re at it, why not also celebrate with the Roundup?

This week we report on a tax change occuring in Colorado that may affect wineries shipping DtC into the state. We then look at all the nuances for suppliers to be aware of when setting up in a state with franchise laws, a new career survey of industry members points out areas for change, and a new story reports on the missing story behind the Judgment of Paris.

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the Sovos/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

Regulatory News and Discussions

TTB Newsletter | Top stories includes the publication of our latest strategic plan, a reminder for breweries that use wine or spirits barrels for aging beer, an announcement about our next malt beverage formula webinar, and three recent field enforcement actions.. TTB

Colorado Announces New Rules For Remote Sellers That Could Affect DtC Wineries | Colorado, recently announced that it will soon begin requiring out-of-state sellers to start collecting and remitting sales tax on their sales to Colorado residents. ShipCompliant by Sovos

A Bridge Too Far For Granholm? Florida Importer Challenges California Three-Tier System | A Florida-based wine importer is hoping to shake up the California three-tier system. DPF-Law

How to Do Business in a Franchise State | A drinks lawyer explains how franchise law works and how suppliers can protect their businesses. SevenFifty Daily

“Frees the Grapes,” Campaign Launches to Give New Jersey Wine Consumers Freedom of Choice | Current shipping restrictions limit New Jersey residents’ access to only 4% of wineries nationwide. Insider NJ

Industry Updates: Market Conditions and Developments

Industry Leaders Weigh in on the State of the Drinks Business | New Career & Salary Survey Report has the industry talking about the future — and opportunities for change. SevenFifty Daily

U.S. Wine Sales Led by Value Increases | Sonoma overtakes Napa in DtC shipment volume as total DtC grows 14%. Wines&Vines

Bye-Bye, Beer? Brewers Say They’ve Got a Plan on Climate Change | Research published this week predicting that beer prices could double as rising global temperatures and more volatile weather cause shortages of barley created a big splash. NPR

Wine Supply is Hitting a Tipping Point | At some point as demand in volume flattens while bearing acres increase, we should expect to see a change in grape buying patterns from wineries and ensuing price changes depending on the specific region and variety. SVB on Wine

Digestif

The Hidden Figures Behind the Judgment of Paris | Many retellings of California wine’s most popular myth omit the women who made the Judgment of Paris happen. SF Chronicle

World’s Most Consumer Liquor Tries to Make It in the U.S. | A distiller of baijui, whose sales in China exceed the global sales of vodka, seeks to expand the high-alcohol spirit to the West. WSJ

26 New Grape Varieties Identified in Bío Bío | A research project into old vines in southern Chile has identified 26 new varieties, previously unknown in the world, and over 60 ‘uncommon’ varieties growing in Bío Bío. Decanter

4 Steps to a Profitable Cyber Monday for Your Winery | The holidays are just around the corner — now’s the time to capitalize on two of the biggest months for wine shipments. VineSpring

 

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

 

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Webinar Recap: Routes to Markets with John Hinman

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Fri, 10/26/2018 - 15:21

Among the ranks of beverage alcohol attorneys, there are few with the experience and depth of knowledge of John Hinman, founding partner of Hinman & Carmichael based in San Francisco. (Read their Booze Rules blog here.) So it was to our great pleasure that John recently joined us at ShipCompliant by Sovos to give a webinar presentation on navigating regulatory restraints when bringing products to market.

Beverage alcohol is a notoriously highly-regulated industry, and there are restrictions and limits on what suppliers can do to sell their products. These restrictions include licensing requirements, the need to register labels, and tax payments — but they often get even more nuanced and particular.

In an increasingly crowded market, where any room for suppliers to expand their presence is precious, these restrictions only add to the pain. And so it becomes invaluable to get ahead of the regulations and know what you are permitted — or prohibited — from doing.

This makes John’s presentation invaluable, as a resource cataloging the basic roadblocks that you will need to navigate on your way to market. If you missed the original presentation, we have posted it online available for you to watch here.

 

Highlights From the Presentation

There are so many particularities and nuances when it comes to legally distributing alcohol that it would be impossible to even brush the surface in a single webinar. However, John pointed out some key aspects to be aware of:

  • Understand the Three-Tier system: Beverage alcohol is not like any other commercial product, even if it acts like it at times. Many other industries break down into different producers, distributors, and retailers of goods — but few have legal mandates that require these to be separate entities. Know that, when entering the industry, you may not be able to engage in all the normal business activities you think you should.
  • 50 States Means 50 Different Sets of Rules: The 21st Amendment not only revoked the rule of Prohibition, it also granted broad power to each state to regulate and control the beverage alcohol market in its borders. While there are some general patterns, each state is unique and has to be looked at freshly each time. You might know how to sell wine in California with your eyes closed, but New York is a whole different animal.
  • Recognize the Different Routes to Market: As with the broader retail market, consumers are increasingly looking for ways to purchase alcohol outside of traditional stores, and laws are changing to accommodate this. Currently, 45 states and D.C. permit wineries to sell and ship directly to their residents. And every state grants at least some right for manufacturers to sell directly to consumers at their production facilities. While the rules can still seem hidebound (for instance, while wineries have a large map at play for direct-to-consumer shipping, retailers, breweries, distilleries, and importers are much more limited), the general trend has been to remove barriers. It is critical for alcohol producers to be aware of these alternative paths for selling their products going forward, while also being aware of the limits that currently restrict them.
  • Be Aware of the Gotchas: While the prospect of getting a product to market may seem rosy at times, there are still a number of ways for things to go sour. A major area of concern for producers are states with franchise laws in place. These laws delimit the ways that producers and wholesalers can set up distribution agreements — and more critically, how these agreements can be renegotiated or terminated. A producer who is cavalier about setting up a distribution agreement could find itself stuck in a rotten deal with no prospect for escape.

Another area of concern are restrictions on advertisements by producers, which has especial importance in the world of social media. Producers need to be aware of state and federal laws that restrict how they talk about their products and where they are available for sale. A stray tweet that unfairly singles out a particular liquor store, or a Facebook post about an upcoming wine-and-food pairing, could get a producer in trouble. To prevent this, anyone engaging in the beverage alcohol industry needs to stay vigilant with their messaging.

We again want to thank John Hinman for his wonderful presentation, and all the work he has done to make the beverage alcohol industry thrive.

 

 

Take the burden of getting products to market off your team with ShipCompliant’s Market Ready solution.

 

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Colorado Announces New Rules for Remote Sellers That Could Affect DtC Wineries

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Tue, 10/16/2018 - 16:46

These are heady days for sales tax wonks, as state after state works to pass rules and regulations that will allow them to impose sales tax obligations on sellers with no physical presence in their borders. This state of affairs was set up earlier this year by a U.S. Supreme Court decision, South Dakota v. Wayfair, which we have written about here.

Generally, these amended rules will not change things for wineries making direct-to-consumer (DtC) shipments, as many states already required them to collect sales tax as a condition of getting a DtC license. However, there were a few exceptions.

Recently, one of those exceptions, Colorado, announced that it will soon begin requiring out-of-state sellers to start collecting and remitting sales tax on their sales to Colorado residents. This will equally affect wineries shipping DtC into the state as it does any other remote seller.

According to the notice issued by the Colorado Department of Revenue, starting on December 1, 2018, remote sellers will need to begin collecting sales tax on their sales to the state if in either the previous or current calendar year they have made $100,000 or more in gross sales delivered in Colorado, including exempt sales; or 200 or more separate transactions selling goods delivered in Colorado.

Notably, this change will also affect any winery that has already has a Retailer Use Tax account in Colorado. If you have a Retailer Use Tax account, and will exceed the thresholds listed above, you will need to close that account and create a new Sales Tax Account.

Businesses can register their Sales Tax Accounts as of November 1, 2018, and new registrants will not be required to collect sales tax on sales made before December 1, 2018. Information from the state about these rule changes, and how to manage your Colorado tax accounts can be found here.

This all comes in light of a recent post by the Tax Foundation ranking Colorado last among states in their preparation to collect sales tax from remote sellers. And indeed, there are many unsettled questions regarding these rule changes. One major open question is how local taxes will be administered. According to the Colorado DOR, signing up for a Sales Tax Account will only obligate the registrant to collect and remit state-administered taxes (these include the state rate of 4.2%, along with some county, city, and district rates that are filed with the state regulators).

However, Colorado permits 349 county, city, and district tax jurisdictions to operate independently, including the administration, registration, collecting, and filing of sales taxes. This creates an enormous hassle for businesses by establishing separate tax systems within the state.

The latest information from Colorado is unclear as to whether remote sellers will be obligated to collect local-administered taxes, or just state taxes. But if the state does determine that local taxes will need to be collected, that will go far outside the bounds of what Justice Kennedy delineated as permissible for a state in the Wayfair ruling. While no challenge has yet been leveled against these new rules, Colorado seems to be blithely walking into potential litigation.

It is little surprise that states want to jump on the post-Wayfair bandwagon and begin reaping a new source of tax revenue. But Colorado’s situation should underscore the need for a careful, deliberate approach when establishing a tax scheme for remote sellers. Old rules that seemed to work when all but a vanishingly small amount of retailers had physical locations in the state cannot be easily mapped onto out-of-state sellers.

At this time no legal challenge has been announced, but it is eminently conceivable that these rules will have to be litigated.

Still, wineries selling DtC into Colorado who meet the above thresholds should pay careful attention to these rule changes, plan appropriately, and make any needed adjustments in their tax accounts and elsewhere to make sure they will meet their obligations in the state. As things develop, if challenges arise or the state clarifies its rules, we will make sure to keep you informed.

 

Tackle compliance in every state with our Direct-to-Consumer Wine Shipping Rules

 

 

 

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10 Key Steps to Expanding Your Brewery’s Footprint

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 17:34

Establishing your brewery’s brand in a crowded craft beer market can be challenging enough, and entering new markets with new products adds more fuel to the fire. But these challenges can be even further complicated by the bevy of regulations that apply to those in the beverage alcohol space. Between licensing, distribution logistics, and compliance obligations issued by governments at the local, state, and federal levels, expanding your brewery’s footprint can seem like a minefield at time.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. To help walk you through the preparation you need to complete before successfully conquering new territories and introducing new products to the market, we’ve put together a comprehensive – and free! – guide, “10 Key Steps to Expanding Your Brewery’s Footprint.” Figure out exactly what you need to do to become market-ready, from assessing your internal capabilities to knowing your audience to developing a foolproof expansion strategy to staying on top of compliance.

 

Download your free copy of “10 Key Steps to Expanding Your Brewery’s Footprint.”

 

 

 

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10 Key Steps to Expanding Your Winery’s Footprint

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 16:24

Branching out into new territories and launching new products can be challenging in a beverage alcohol industry ripe with regulatory requirements and complications. Between licensing, market analysis, distribution and supply chain logistics, and complying with regulations imposed by governments at the state, local, and federal levels, expanding your winery’s footprint can be one landmine of potential noncompliance after another.

How can you successfully navigate these complications, and ensure your products are ready to hit the market on time while fulfilling all your obligations? Fear not – we’ve put together a comprehensive guide to conquering the tricky landscape of getting your products to market! Learn what you need to know to prepare your business for growth, from assessing your own internal capabilities to building the right strategy to sorting out logistics and compliance issues.

 

Download your free copy of “10 Key Steps to Expanding Your Winery’s Footprint.”

 

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BevAlc Roundup | “Granholm 2” Enters the Spotlight, a Cheating Scandal Roils Latest Sommelier Exam, and Augmented Reality for Wineries

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 10/15/2018 - 13:27

It’s well into October now, which means the leaves are turning, the grape harvest is winding down, and all the beer is pumpkin spiced. Now’s also a chance for a brief pause before things really pick up for the holiday season, so why not relax a bit with the Roundup?

This week we have a couple in-case-you-missed-it posts from the regular blog feed on developments in the courts: first, our take on Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Ass’n v. Byrd, a case out of Tennessee that will no doubt take up much of the oxygen over the next few months; and second, a Michigan case that once again rules that the state can’t discriminate against out-of-state retailers when creating retailer DtC shipping laws. Then, we look at what the recently negotiated USMCA trade agreement could mean for trading wine, how the 2018 harvest is shaping up (spoiler: it’s looking great!), and what an upcoming wine auction shows about historical tastes and preferences.

In other news for this week’s Roundup, wineries are facing added pressure from Chinese tariffs, the beer industry discusses where it can find growth in the future, and American saké is coming into its own.

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the Sovos/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

 

Regulatory News and Discussions

TTB Newsletter | Top stories includes updated guidance for the wine industry on filing returns and reports annually, and reminders about changes you can make to previously approved alcohol beverage labels that don’t require you to get a new COLA. TTB

Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Tennessee Case Many Are Calling “Granholm 2” |

Byrd presents the opportunity for the Court to clarify many questions left unsettled after Granholm. ShipCompliant by Sovos

Michigan Court Rules Against Discriminatory Retailer Direct-to-Consumer Shipping Law — Again |  The case, Lebamoff Enterprises v. Snyder, is the second time in a decade that a court has ruled against a Michigan law of this type. ShipCompliant by Sovos

California Wine Achieved Major Wine With USMCA Trade Deal | American wine industry executives said U.S. trade negotiations with Canada produced meaningful progress in eliminating some protectionist policies, particularly in the province of British Columbia. CNBC

California Wineries Will Be Allowed To Post Photos To Social Media Ahead of Special Events | Assembly Bill 2452 which Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law on Sept. 22, gives wineries and alcohol producers the opportunity to post the photos ahead of the special event. Winebusiness.com

Tied-House Law Update | During the Wine, Beer & Spirits Law Conference, Marc Sorini discussed recent legal developments in federal and state trade practice law. Alcohol Law Advisor

Oregon Lawmaker Seek Probe of Winery Deception | Say labels infer California wine actually from Oregon. KTVA-21

 

Industry Updates: Market Conditions and Developments

2018 Could Be “One for the Record Books” | Napa and Sonoma grapegrowers report extended hang time and steady picking pace, yielding healthy and “happy” grapes. Wines&Vines

Cheating Scandal Invalidates Latest Master Sommelier Tasting Exam | Court of Master Sommeliers, Americas, reports that passing candidates must retake the tasting portion. SevenFifty Daily

Led By $23 Million Purchase of Cisco Brewers, Craft Brew Alliance Buys 3 Beer Companies | CBA, a publicly traded craft brewery group headquartered in Portland, Ore., today announced that it would wholly acquire Massachusetts’ Cisco Brewers, North Carolina’s Appalachian Mountain Brewery and Miami’s Wynwood Brewing. Brewbound

The Millennial Wine Smell Test: Non-Conforming Beverages | Wine and beer crossovers defy convention. How are they being marketed to younger drinkers? Wine Spectator

 

Digestif

What “Amazon Effect?” Wholesalers Conflate Issues | Wholesalers and retailers have a new boogeyman to scare legislators. It’s called Amazon. And in a few states they are conflating the so-called “Amazon effect” to prevent the expansion of consumer choice with winery direct shipping. Free the Grapes!

Augmented Reality for Wine: Past, Present & Future | With Treasury, Gallo, and other wine producers launching their own augmented reality wine apps, it’s worth reviewing the evolution of this digital marketing tactic within the wine industry and what to expect in the future. Medium

Wine As History, Not Just Industry | Christie’s, in advance of an important December auction, describes the discovery and character of a historic cache of old Madeira found in New Jersey’s Liberty Hall Museum at Keen University back in 2016. Fermentation

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

The post BevAlc Roundup | “Granholm 2” Enters the Spotlight, a Cheating Scandal Roils Latest Sommelier Exam, and Augmented Reality for Wineries appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

Michigan Court Rules Against Discriminatory Retailer Direct-to-Consumer Shipping Law – Again

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Tue, 10/02/2018 - 17:51

The District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan ruled that a Michigan law preventing out-of-state retailers from shipping DtC to Michigan retailers is unconstitutional on Friday, September 28. The case, Lebamoff Enterprises v. Snyder, is the second time in a decade that a court has ruled against a Michigan law of this type. (Read this post from the ShipCompliant archives.)

At issue was a law in Michigan permitting in-state retailers to ship alcohol directly to Michigan residents through common carriers, while preventing out-of-state retailers from doing the same (or more precisely, Michigan did not permit out-of-state retailers to get the license required to enable them to make direct-to-consumer (DtC) shipments).

Currently, only 13 states and the District of Columbia permit out-of-state retailers to ship DtC to their residents. This is a more narrow map than for wineries, who can now ship DtC to residents of 45 states and D.C.

Wineries have more expansive DtC rights due to both concerted lobbying efforts to change state rules, and a clearer jurisprudence: while the 2005 Supreme Court ruling Granholm v. Heald, which established the current legal basis for winery DtC shipping, clearly applied to beverage alcohol suppliers, its application to retailers and wholesalers has been the subject of debate. (This post talks about that debate.)

However, the District Court’s ruling in Lebamoff v. Snyder represents another win for retailers as they work to get Granholm applied to retailers. (The case also could have big implications for another current lawsuit, Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailer Ass’n v. Byrd, which the Supreme Court recently granted certiorari to.)

Notably, this recent decision mimics a case from ten years ago, where a previous Michigan law preventing out-of-state retailers from shipping DtC while permitting in-state retailers to do so was invalidated. After that case, Michigan amended its rules to prohibit all DtC shipping from retailers (retailers were afterwards permitted to make DtC deliveries, but only using their own vehicles, which is a major blocker for out-of-state retailers).

Michigan amended its rules again last year to their current (discriminatory) state. Why the state thought the rule would pass muster this time is unknown, but apparently it is having no more luck now than it did back then.

Where this case will go is unclear. Michigan could appeal the ruling and hope that a higher court will be more favorable (but again, the Supreme Court could head this off in Byrd). The state could also cut its losses and repeal the rule, reverting to a situation where no retailer can ship DtC, as it did ten years ago. Or, the state could accept this ruling and come to grips with a world where retailers can ship DtC to Michigan residents.

Taking this last option might just be the easiest solution for the state. After all, there has been tremendous success in establishing licensing, tax, and reporting requirements for shipping DtC. While most states only allow wine producers to enter this market, in those 13 states, plus D.C., retailers have shown they can also comply with state rules. And this also reflects the broader economic reality too, where consumers want greater access to more products — even those not distributed in their state — and search for those products online.

How Michigan will react to this latest setback has yet to be seen. But there is the potential for the state to make a big change, and even possibly on the leading edge of a bigger wave of regulatory changes as retailers seek to gain the right to ship alcohol to residents of more states.

 

Stay on top of every state’s regulations, and any updates they may introduce, using our Direct-to-Consumer Wine Shipping Rules tool.

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Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Tennessee Case Many Are Calling “Granholm 2”

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Tue, 10/02/2018 - 17:24

On Thursday September 27, the United States Supreme Court agreed to hear Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Assn. v. Byrd (herein, just Byrd), which caused a tizzy to break out among those who follow beverage alcohol regulations. This is big news because for one, Byrd will be the first beverage alcohol case heard by the Court in over a decade. That last case, Granholm v. Heald, sparked big changes for the industry, including the development of the modern DtC shipping market.

But more than that, Byrd presents the opportunity for the Court to clarify many questions left unsettled after Granholm. Indeed, within hours of the Court granting cert, many were already proclaiming Byrd to be Granholm 2.

On its face, Byrd seems to revolve around a simple question: are Tennessee’s residency requirements for holders of an off-premises package retail license valid? Within that question, though, are deeper, major questions for the regulation of beverage alcohol, including the broader validity of residency requirements, and whether the ruling from Granholm — that the power the 21st Amendment grants to the states to regulate beverage alcohol can be abrogated by the Commerce Clause — apply to retailers and wholesalers as much as it applies to suppliers?

This later question has been an ongoing issue ever since Granholm was decided in 2005, with courts divided. This confusion have been problematic for retailers and wholesalers, though, as their efforts to enjoy the same legal standing that suppliers have had since Granholm have been stymied. In particular, access to the interstate direct-to-consumer (DtC) market that has exploded over the last decade has been greatly limited. (For more on how Granholm has been applied to retailers in the past, please read this post from our blog.)

However, it is far from certain that the Court will make a major ruling in Byrd. Not only is it notoriously difficult to predict how the Court will rule on a case, but there are many ways that the Court could issue a narrow decision and not get at the thorny issues that have excited so many of the boozeratti. Nevertheless, the Court taking up Byrd is still big news, even if the ruling does not provide satisfactory resolution to the unsettled Granholm issues.

 

What Is Byrd About?

Byrd looks at existing rules in Tennessee requiring all retail liquor store licensees (i.e. off-premises consumption package stores) to have maintained residency in the state for at least two years prior to applying for a new license, and for ten years prior to applying to a renewed license (and yes, the weirdness of these durations has been remarked on a lot). In addition, for corporations, these residency requirements apply to every director, officer, and shareholder.

For many years, the national chain retailer Total Wine and Spirits looked to enter the Tennessee market, but had been impeded by these residency rules. Nevertheless, the Tennessee ABC got word that Total Wine and Spirits was going to apply anyway, which would likely lead to a legal challenge. To head off that challenge, the Tennessee Attorney General filed suit to obtain a declaratory judgment regarding the constitutionality of the residency requirements. The Tennessee Wine and Spirits Retailers Association joined that suit as a defendant, arguing that the residency rules were valid.

The District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee ruled that the residency rules were unconstitutional, as they were discriminatory on their face against out-of-state businesses in a way that the plaintiffs could not justify under the state’s 21st Amendment powers. The District Court reasoned, following the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Bacchus Imports v. Dias (1984), that beverage alcohol regulations that are based purely on economic protectionism are not granted the same deference as laws related to combating the perceived evils of the beverage alcohol market.

The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld this ruling this past February, leading to the petition that the U.S. Supreme Court accepted.

 

What’s Really At Issue?

While the immediate issue seems to just be whether a business like Total Wine and Spirits can enter the Tennessee market, Byrd has the potential to drastically change 21st Amendment jurisprudence going forward.

For most of its history, the 21st Amendment (specifically clause 2) has been deemed to grant near carte blanche to states to regulate the beverage alcohol market in their borders. However, over the past few decades, the Supreme Court has been increasingly open to limiting states’ regulatory powers, particularly when those regulations appear to inhibit interstate commerce.

The last time the Court looked at the 21st Amendment was Granholm, in which the Court determined that rules in Michigan and New York permitting instate wineries, but not out-of-state wineries, to ship directly to their residents were invalid as discriminatory. But because Granholm primarily dealt with the rights of wineries, the case has often been narrowly applied only to suppliers (though there have been exceptions, which are again discussed here).

The Court in Byrd, therefore, could make a major splash in beverage alcohol regulatory jurisprudence by applying its Granholm ruling to retailers. If that were to happen, then all manner of state regulations could come into question. A wave of litigation could arise, as rules that appear to discriminate against out-of-state businesses get challenged under a new legal environment.

State liquor regulators would need to figure out ways to incorporate many more non-local businesses into their systems — or take away rights enjoyed by local businesses (to remove the stain of discrimination). As states act to further enable local businesses to operate in the modern economy (such as granting more rights to make DtC shipments), they will be faced with having to similarly enable out-of-state businesses. Indeed, there is good reason for people to call Byrd a potential Granholm 2.

 

What Might Happen Now?

The reigning scuttlebutt is all about the chance that Byrd will lead to a complete overhaul of the three-tier system and beverage alcohol regulations. And it is true that Byrd brings this possibility. But focussing on this one outcome can cloud one to the larger realm of rulings the Court could issue.

There is the one extreme outcome, that the Court will issue the major ruling that has caught the imagination of so many in the industry. It could determine that Granholm applies equally to all members of the beverage alcohol industry, meaning that regulations discriminating against out-of-state businesses will have to be reviewed, and those that cannot be justified under some reasoning related to preventing a perceived “evil” will be invalidated. (In this age, so far removed from the days of tied-house saloons and Prohibition, demonstrating those evils is also increasingly difficult.)

States with residency requirements, or those that grant only in-state businesses certain rights (or those that provide certain licenses only to in-state businesses), will need to amend or get rid of those restrictions. This could have major implications for the three-tier system writ large, as most of the original intent behind establishing this regulatory scheme was to privilege local operators (particularly the wholesaler and retailer tiers).

However, the other extreme is retrenchment and a reversion to the view that states’ 21st Amendment powers are unrestricted by Commerce Clause arguments. While overturning Granholm is extremely unlikely, the Court might at least rule that Granholm does not apply to any tier besides suppliers, enabling states to more freely discriminate against out-of-state wholesalers and retailers. This outcome may be unlikely, even outlandish, but it should not be overlooked as possibility.

In between these extremes, though, there is a sea of narrower rulings it could issue instead. Indeed, given the history of the Court and its generally cautious approach means a narrow ruling is more likely than a major one. One possibility is that Court could rule that, while the 2-year term is invalid, a state could still require some kind of residency for a license holder. Indeed, the fact that Total Wine and Spirits is looking to establish an in-state package store should dampen the argument by the Tennessee Retailers Association that the state needs to have proximate control over sellers of alcohol. In this way, the Court could remove barriers for retailers to establish themselves in Tennessee without also establishing a borderless market for retail sales of beverage alcohol.

And even if the Court does rule that Granholm does apply to retailers, that does not inherently mean that retailers will suddenly have the right to ship everywhere. Indeed, when courts have ruled in the past that a state has to grant retailer-DtC shipping rights equally to in-state and out-of-state retailers, those rights have often been taken away for everyone in order to remove their discriminatory effect. Similarly, even 13 years after Granholm, several states continue to prohibit DtC shipping even by wineries.

Predicting the actions of the Supreme Court is generally a fool’s errand. The Court is notorious for upsetting expectations and finding ways to narrow arguments so as to avoid making major decisions.

However, there are still reasons to be cautiously excited about the possibilities of Byrd. For one, the Court would not have taken up this case unless it saw there was an issue to resolve, and not just on a ticky-tacky issue like the proper time frame for establishing residency. For another, the Court on a broad level is moving to get a better handle of what might be called the new, modern economy.

Earlier this year, the Court made a major ruling in South Dakota v. Wayfair, upending decades of sales tax rules in an attempt to provide a tax regulatory scheme for the eCommerce world. Byrd, therefore, could be another chance for the Court to wrench a hidebound industry into the modern economy, by acknowledging that state borders are increasingly less relevant to the ways people buy goods these days.

At the time of publication, the Court has not set a date for the hearings in Byrd. It could be months before arguments are made, with months more before the ruling is issued. And even once that ruling is issued, there will be many more weeks, months, and years for its fallout to be worked out. So no one should hold their breath waiting for things to change. For now, it should be enough to know that the potential for change is out there.

Stayed tuned to this blog for further developments in this case, and other regulatory and market changes that affect the beverage alcohol industry.

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by requesting a free demo.

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BevAlc Roundup | U.S. Supreme Court accepts certiorari in Tennessee retailer case, a potential recession in the wine market, and alcohol myths get debunked.

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 10/01/2018 - 13:36

Last week, on Thursday night, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear Tennessee Wine & Spirits v. Byrd Clayton, causing the beverage alcohol regulation community into a tizzy. Though the case has the potential to mix up years of three-tier jurisprudence (particularly whether retailers can equally participate in the DtC shipping market), these are still early days and the Court has a habit of upset people’s expectations. So while we will be paying close attention to this case, we would recommend everyone not panic anytime soon. For now, we’ll provide you all with a measured overview of the case provided by the Alcohol Law Advisor blog.

In other news for this week’s Roundup, wineries are facing added pressure from Chinese tariffs, the beer industry discusses where it can find growth in the future, and American saké is coming into its own.

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the Sovos/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

 

Regulatory News and Discussions

TTB Newsletter | Top stories include updated guidance for bonded wineries’ eligibility for annual reporting and advice on making changes to approved labels. TTB

US Supreme Court To Review State Residency Requirements | The “final word” may be in sight in a long-running dispute over state residency requirements imposed on applicants for retail alcohol beverage licenses. Alcohol Law Advisor

Wine Industry Frets Over Additional Chinese Tariffs | Added duties that took effect this week raise the total tariff rate for California wines to 79 percent. Western Farm Press

Major Changes To Beer Wholesaler Operations in California | Governor Brown approved a bill on September 19, 2018, that will impose a range of significant new restrictions on California-licensed beer wholesalers. Alcohol.law

Senate Passes Bipartisan Resolution Recognizing Contributions of American Viticultural Areas | Builds upon global industry efforts to promote awareness of and appreciation for protecting all wine region names worldwide. Wine Industry Advisor

What You Need To Know About the GDPR | How U.S. beverage alcohol companies can comply with new EU privacy regulations. SevenFifty Daily

 

Industry Updates: Market Conditions and Developments

Wine Market Up 3% In Volume, 4% in Value | Gomberg Fredrikson paints picture of growth in first six months of 2018. Wines&Vines

Dogfish, Mike’s, and Yuengling Execs Address Industry Challenges at NBWA Meeting | The faster beer companies embrace segments that are connecting with consumers, the quicker the overall industry can return to growth. Brewbound

Wine Industry Faces Changing Market, Economy | At Wine Industry Financial Symposium CFOs expect recession and grape brokers see large 2018 harvest. Wines&Vines

2017 Oregon Vineyard and Winery Report Released | Oregon added 44 more wineries last year, with planted acreage and exports at all-time highs and sales volume up 16%, far outpacing the wine catofoy’s national growth rate of 1.6%. Wine Industry Advisor

 

Digestif

Don’t Judge a Wine By Its Label | Some labels seem as if their main purpose is to deceive. Press Democrat

China’s Wine Industry Gets Serious | It’s well known for its taste for international wines, but China’s domestic scene is growing too. Wine-searcher.com

American Saké Takes Flight | Thanks to a combination of limited options and consumer confusion about the category, until recently, finding a decent selection of Japanese saké statewide has been a challenge. Imbibe

Deer Blood Liqueur, and Six Other Urban Legends in Booze History | There are many legends associate with alcohol throughout history. VinePair

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

The post BevAlc Roundup | U.S. Supreme Court accepts certiorari in Tennessee retailer case, a potential recession in the wine market, and alcohol myths get debunked. appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

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