Direct Shipment & Compliance

BevAlc Roundup | Tariffs affect the industry, TTB levies its heaviest fine ever, and are regulations hampering the adoption of new technology?

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 06/11/2018 - 18:25

We held our annual Wine Summit event on May 31, at the Napa Valley Marriott. The Summit was once again a fabulous occasion, full of regulatory updates, looks at market trends, and tips and tricks to improve DtC and three-tier sales. If you missed it, or just want to refresh your memory, read our follow-up post.

For this week’s Roundup, we have a special section looking into some foreign trade issues, including the latest on how tariffs are harming the industry. We then look at how efforts to open Delaware up to DtC sales are progressing, global trends in the sale of beer, and why weird, archaic, and super-local wine varietals are poised for a resurgence.

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the Sovos/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

ShipCompliant Events

Sovos’ Technology Partner Manager, Curry Wilson, will be speaking at two events at the end of June on compliance issues and how you can use technology to create best practices for your winery wine expanding your DtC footprints. Other industry experts will also be presenting, so there is sure to be much for everyone to learn.

If you’re in the region, please consider attending. For more information, click below:

Special Section: Trade and Exports News

Tariffs on Aluminum Are A Tax On Beer | This aluminum tariff will dramatically increase the manufacturing costs of American brewers and beer importers. Beer Institute

New Tariffs Risk Turning U.S. Whiskey Sour | An escalating international trade spat is driving up equipment costs and threatens to cut into profits from bottles exported to Europe, just as business is booming. Reuters

Trump Administration Seeks WTO Panel To Resolve Wine Dispute with Canada | The administration wants the WTO to set up a dispute panel to rule on its claim of Canada’s “discriminatory” practices in the province of British Columbia. CNBC

LegislativeUpdate

TTB Newsletter | Top stories include the release of the 2018 TTB Satisfaction Survey and an alternate procedure regarding the storage of tax-determined and non-tax-determined products. TTB

Retailers Fear Amazon Effect With Direct Wine Shipments | Wineries are major tourist attractions across the country. But vacationing Delawareans are in for a rude awakening if they decide to ship a case back home. Delaware Business Times

TTB Levies Largest Fine Ever | It’s been a big year already for federal agencies when it comes to dishing out fines — and a painful one for the recipients. Wine-searcher.com

Work To Open More States To DTC Wine Shipments Continues | State regulators zero in on illegal shipments. Wine Business

Why Can’t Native Americans Make Whiskey? | Outdated, paternalistic laws prevent tribes from taking part in the craft-spirits boom. The New York Times
IndustryUp

The Key Trend In The Global Beer Industry? “Drinking Less, But Drinking Better” | Beer drinkers are seeking quality or quantity, evidence by continued growth in premium, super-premium and craft categories. Beverage Daily

California Domestic Wine Revenue Successfully Endured A Decade Of Retail Flatness | It appears that California wine lost 3% of domestic market share to imports over the past decade, but in hard cash, its domestic wine revenue increased. Forbes

Growing DTC Wine Sales Locally and Digitally | An interview with Sandra Hess, Founder of DTC Wine Workshops Consulting Agency. Copper Peak Logistics

Secrets For Growing Direct-to-Consumer Wines Sales 2018 Videocast | On May 16, 2018, SVB’s Wine Division hosted a live videocast discussion of trends in direct-to-consumer wine sales based upon findings from a survey of more than 800 responses. SVB

JustFun

The Secret Trigger That Makes You Reach For Your Favorite Bottle Of Wine | As wine sales continue to climb in the U.S., vintners are incorporating augmented reality and other innovations in wine label design. CNBC

Why You Should Be Drinking Weird Wines | For years, the global wine industry had been devolving toward a monoculture, with local grape varieties ripped out in favor of more immediately profitable, mass-market types. The New York Times

The Slow Adoption of Technology In Wine Is Political | The single greatest deterrent to the wine industry becoming a full-fledged adopted of new economy tools isn’t a luddite’s aversion to the expanding digital toolbox. It is the anti-competitive, anti-consumer, and market-disabling state laws that champion barriers to trade. Fermentation

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

The post BevAlc Roundup | Tariffs affect the industry, TTB levies its heaviest fine ever, and are regulations hampering the adoption of new technology? appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

ShipCompliant Wine Summit: Impressions and Lessons

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Wed, 06/06/2018 - 18:38

ShipCompliant by Sovos hosted its annual users conference — rebranded as the ShipCompliant Wine Summit, a part of Sovos’ Global Compliance Series of events — last week at the Napa Valley Marriott. ShipCompliant users gathered for a day of training before hearing from officials and experts to learn about the regulatory and market forces that are shaping the industry.

The annual event, now in its 13th year, is always an exciting time for our team. We enjoy getting together with our clients and so many other wonderful people all working to make this market successful.

This year coincided with the release of our latest tool, which enables efficient, effective compliance with beverage alcohol regulations: Market Ready. As such, we took the opportunity in the conference to expand our focus beyond just the Direct-to-Consumer (DtC) market, to how wineries can better operate in the three-tier channel.

Of course, DtC was still a major topic at the Wine Summit; but, back in Napa after a two-year sojourn and rebrand, we wanted to underscore the gestalt nature of the wine market: from grapes to glass, there are any number of ways for wineries to succeed, but you have to look at the whole system itself to best understand how you can achieve that success.

For those of you who were able to attend, we again want to extend our deepest appreciation for you and your continued support. For those who unfortunately missed the event, we’ve summarized it below. (And be sure to keep an eye out on our blog for more in-depth summaries of some of the panels we hosted in the coming weeks.)

 

The Sovosian Model of Compliance

Pawel Smolarkiewicz, Chief Product Officer for Sovos, kicked off the event, speaking on how government regulation of businesses are changing and Sovos’s role in making compliance possible. With our global reach experience in all manners of facilitating business to government compliance reporting, Sovos is deeply enmeshed in the latest in overall business compliance needs, not just the unique challenges that the wine industry faces.

Pawel explained how the technology services that are helping businesses scale their compliance needs are a bit of a double-edged sword as it also enables government greater ability to scrutinize these records. Overall, his message was positive, though, seeing more opportunity for both governments and businesses to improve their processes with better technology to create a virtuous cycle of supporting each other’s development. As Pawel remarked, the wine industry is well positioned to handle this changing regulatory environment, as for the past decade they have been handling such compliance requirements. In effect, wineries have already adopted the new processes and tools that other businesses are only beginning to grapple with.

Larry Cormier, General Manager of ShipCompliant by Sovos, spoke next, narrowing Pawel’s message of global compliance to the beverage alcohol experience. He sought to demonstrate Sovos’ deep-seeded commitment to supporting the wine industry’s compliance needs. A reaffirmation of our pledge to provide top-rate performance and customer support, along with enabling our clients’ growth, will shape the immediate and long-term future of ShipCompliant by Sovos. Lexie Schaefer, Product Manager for ShipCompliant by Sovos, also spoke on these commitments detailing how exactly we will meet the challenge.

 

Updates on the Wine Market

The morning continued with a panel of our partners hosted by Andrew Adams, of Wines & Vines. Also speaking were Jennifer Goodrich of Wineshipping, Paul Thienes of eCellar, and Jerry van Sickle of FedEx. Pawel Smolarkiewicz also returned to the stage to provide the compliance perspective. They spoke on what the consumer experience looks like these days, and what wineries can do to make that experience successful for everyone.

As always, fulfilling customer needs is central to selling wine. But these days, creating a good overall experience for the customer is the key to fulfilling those needs. Customers no longer are satisfied with just a quality product, they want to feel like they’re catered to at every step from when they first think to buy a bottle of wine until they’re actually drinking it.

Good use of data and other technology services can enable wineries to meet these demands. Enabling customers to customize their own experience is also a great way to ensure they can have their unique needs met. Naturally, regulatory issues were discussed, with the overall message being technology can help here too; by enabling all of your systems to talk to each other, from sales to shipping to accounting, minimizing the stress that compliance can bring. Compliance is an inherent part of the wine industry (and in particular DtC sales); by facing regulatory challenges head on, you can ensure that it won’t drag down the rest of your business.

Larry Cormier then took back the stage, joined by Danny Brager of Nielsen, to talk about what the data are showing about wine sales. Though it’s not really news, Danny showed how important eCommerce has become to the entire U.S. retail market, with fast moving goods, like groceries and alcohol, being on the leading end of growth in eCommerce.

The boom in remote selling, along with greater consolidation in the distributor and retailer tiers, means that DtC must become an even greater part of every winery’s business models. And things are looking rather cheery for the DtC wine market; 2017 was another record year in sales, and every indication so far is that 2018 will be even bigger. Larry noted that it was not at all unlikely that we’ll surpass the $3 billion mark this year, up from $2.65 billion in 2017.

Meanwhile, in the broader wine market, there were a few points that Danny stressed. Notably certain things we thought may have just been fads — rosé and wine in cans — are turning into trends. These areas have been trending up so much and so sustainably, that we cannot think they’ll go away.

The ultimate message that Larry and Danny wanted to impart was the importance of using these data points. By understanding what your customers want, and by understanding how well you’re meeting those demands, you can make their experience better and more likely to repeat.

 

A Deeper Dive Into Compliance Issues

After lunch, we hosted breakout panels delving more deeply into certain issues affecting the wine industry. These were divided into two concurrent tracks looking at the DtC and three-tier markets, respectively.

Starting the afternoon were regulatory-focused sessions. Our Industry Outreach Advisor, Alex Koral, hosted a panel on staying compliant within the increasingly-scrutinized DtC market. He was joined by Matt Botting, Chief Counsel for the California Alcohol Beverage Commission, Alex Heckathorn of Compliance Service of America, and Carole Peterson from Wente Vineyards.

They discussed some of the leading compliance issues in the DtC market, such as the importance of conducting age verifications, dealing with trade practice restrictions on wineries advertising their products, and how the taxman may actually be the biggest risk for enforcement action. The main message, speaking of enforcement actions, was how important it is to have an active compliance support team and to respond to any state communications you may receive. The point is one we note often: complacence is not compliance.

The following panel looked more at how wineries can improve their online markets in order to generate more DtC sales. This panel was hosted by our Technology Partner Manager, Curry Wilson, who spoke with Andrea Gonzalez of Treasury Wine Estates, Sandra Hess of DTC Wine Workshops, and Jason Moore from Modus Operandi Cellars.

They explained how necessary it is for wineries to utilize all available digital marketing solutions, such as augmented reality, video tours of the winery, personal email campaigns, and social media analytics. When you’re trying to stand out in a crowded marketplace, it’s necessary to engage your audience with a compelling story of why you’re different. By extending your tasting room into a digital marketplace, you can get ahead of the game.

At the same time, two other panels looked at regulatory and market issues affecting wineries’ three-tier sales. First off, our Regulatory Counsel, Lauren Whitney, hosted Jillyan Ramos of Delicato Family Vineyards and Sara Schorske from Compliance Service of America, in a discussion of how regulatory conditions affect how wineries get their products into new markets. By understanding and getting ahead of complex licensing and registration processes, wineries can ensure their products get onto store shelves faster and more efficiently, and avoid unnecessary delays to their distribution plans.

This panel was followed by a more market-focused discussion on how wineries can expand their three-tier footprints, hosted by our Client Success Advisor, Liz Yount. She spoke with John Hinman from Hinman & Carmichael, David Von Stroh from Zepponi & Company, and Gordon Waggoner form Acumen Wine. They discussed best practices for wineries to manage their sales in the three-tier channel, including how to engage with distributors and strategies for identifying future markets. A notable lesson from this panel was how having a successful DtC sales line can positively influence a winery’s three-tier sales by providing clear proof that that winery’s products are already selling well.

 

State of the Wine Industry

It wouldn’t have been the ShipCompliant Wine Summit without an annual regulatory update from the inimitable Steve Gross, Vice President, State Relations for Wine Institute. He presented on what states have been up to in 2017 and 2018 regarding regulating DtC wine sales.

The overall theme of Steve’s presentation focused on the surge in enforcement actions that states have been taking within the DtC market. 2017 saw the most enforcement notices ever, with many unlicensed and improper entities being told they cannot continue making DtC sales. This has had knock-on effects for legitimate DtC sellers, especially as many states are also pressuring common carriers to better prevent illegal DtC sales from happening. Steve predicted that more states will add rules requiring reports from common carriers and fulfillment centers to better track DtC sales, following Illinois’s lead.

Steve previewed the next state slated to open to DtC wine sales, Oklahoma, whose DtC law will become effective October 1, 2018. Wine Institute worked hard since the law was first passed in 2016 to correct several regulations that would have severely hampered the DtC market in the state. Currently, Oklahoma seems set to become a DtC state more or less like any other (we will be writing a thorough preview post as the effective date nears, going over all the regulations that wineries should be aware of when entering Oklahoma).

This was in contrast to Kentucky, which passed an interesting DtC bill earlier this year. There are many unresolved questions and unfortunate restrictions, which seem to make the law largely unworkable for wineries. While Steve was optimistic that some of these issues could be worked out in a positive manner, he urged wineries to be cautious when it comes to DtC sales in Kentucky and not to enter that market until things have been worked out.

Steve also discussed other DtC bills, which failed to pass through their respective states’ legislatures this year. These included bills to open up Mississippi and Alabama (though it was notable how far these bills did go this year), and bills to add proper licensing and tax rules for DtC sales in Alaska and Minnesota (in these states, then, the status quo prevails). But a bill to open up Delaware, and one to remove the production cap for wineries selling DtC to New Jersey, are still alive, which Steve mentioned with a note of cautious optimism.

In all, the changes that we see happening with the regulation of DtC sales largely mirrors those highlighted by Pawel at the beginning of the day, with technology becoming ever more central to how governments can regulate businesses. But this should be seen in a positive light, as technology also makes it easier for business to comply with those regulations. By bridging the gaps between government and business and automating compliance needs, technology can smooth those barriers that could so often be a roadblock to a business’s growth.

We again want to thank all the fantastic panelists who participated this year, and all of you wonderful clients, friends, and partners who attended. We’re already looking forward to next year’s event, and hope you will be there!

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos newest tool, Market Ready, can help your business stay on top of compliance in every state by signing up for a free demo.

The post ShipCompliant Wine Summit: Impressions and Lessons appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

Sovos Announces Solution to Automate Beverage Alcohol Compliance for Brand Label Registrations

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Thu, 05/31/2018 - 10:00
Market Ready enables suppliers to get products to market more efficiently across different states.

 

May 31, 2018, Napa, Calif. [Sovos GCS ShipCompliant Wine Summit] — Today, at its annual ShipCompliant Wine Summit, Sovos announced the release of Market Ready, a solution that automates compliance tasks and enables beverage alcohol suppliers to get products to market more efficiently.

Market Ready, available immediately, is an accurate and flexible tool for completing the various brand label registration requirements in different states.  With Market Ready, users select which products to register in which states, and the solution instantly populates forms and cover letters, pulls COLAs from the TTB database and collates the documents into one complete package.

The new solution:

  • Simplifies complex state-specific processes by providing a single, consistent workflow
  • Saves time by generating cover letters, auto-populating state forms, attaching required documents and providing a clear view of what is approved and ready to sell
  • Reduces rejections and back-and-forth with regulators by ensuring all necessary components are included before brand label registrations are submitted
  • Features requirements and forms maintained by Sovos, so suppliers no longer need to spend time and energy looking up individual state requirements

“With product registration processes and regulations varying so widely among states, suppliers can get bogged down in trying to stay compliant through manual processes,” said Larry Cormier, General Manager of ShipCompliant by Sovos. “When suppliers use Market Ready to automate compliance processes, they can keep up with massive workloads and drastically reduce the time required to stay in compliance. As a result, suppliers are better able to serve their customers by getting products to market on time.”

About Sovos

Sovos is a global leader in tax compliance and business-to-government reporting software, safeguarding businesses from the burden and risk of compliance around the world. As governments go digital, businesses face increased risk and complexity. The Sovos Intelligent Compliance Cloud combines world-class regulatory analysis with a global cloud software platform to create an adaptable, connected and global compliance solution that keeps businesses ahead of the ever-changing regulatory environment. Sovos supports 4,500 companies, including half of the Fortune 500, and integrates with a wide variety of business applications. Based in Boston, Sovos has offices throughout North America, Latin America and Europe. For more information visit www.sovos.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

The post Sovos Announces Solution to Automate Beverage Alcohol Compliance for Brand Label Registrations appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

BevAlc Roundup | TTB provides excise tax reporting fixes for wineries, our review of this year’s Craft Brewers Conference, and how to succeed with canned wine

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Tue, 05/29/2018 - 05:15

This is it! It’s the week of the annual GCS: Wine Summit! If you’re going to be in the Napa area on May 31, time’s almost up to register! If you can’t make it, rest assured that we’ll be writing extensively about all the great insights and stories that came up in the panels, which will show up soon on the Roundup.

For this week’s Roundup, the TTB has published important information for beverage alcohol producers around the use of hemp in their products along with a new circular on fixes to the Craft Beverage Modernization and Tax Reform Act for wineries storing their untaxpaid wine off of their premises. We then have the U.S. taking action against Canada in the WTO, new menu labeling rules that affect the bev alc industry, Silicon Valley Bank recently held a videocast with amazing insights into the DtC wine market, and why hybrid craft breweries and distilleries are more and more common.

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the ShipCompliant/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

 

ShipCompliant Events

GCS: Wine Summit, our annual wine industry conference is happening this week! This year, we’ll be hosting the event at the Napa Valley Marriott on May 31, with panels on the state of DtC wine sales and how to expand your three-tier distribution footprint. Sign up here!

GCS: Wine Summit: Speakers, Sessions, and Keynotes | A preview of what you can anticipate at the upcoming GCS: Wine Summit. Register today!

LegislativeUpdate

TTB Newsletter | Top stories include a new FAQ regarding TTB’s policy around use of hemp and updated FAQs related to fixes to the CBMTRA for wineries. TTB

IMPORTANT: TTB Industry Circular: 2018-1A | Alternate procedure for a wine producer to tax determine and tax pay wine of its production that is stored untaxpaid at a Bonded Wine Cellar. TTB

Wine Institute Commends U.S. Government’s Efforts To Improve Market Access In Canada | Wine Institute applauds today’s announcement that the U.S. government has required a formal World Trade Organization dispute settlement panel against Canada to ensure that U.S. wines have equal access to British Columbia grocery stores shelves. Wine Institute

How New FDA Menu Labeling Rules May Affect Beverage Alcohol Suppliers | Starting May 7, 2018, certain restaurants and similar food service providers need to comply with new menu labeling requirements designed to provide nutritional information to customers. ShipCompliant

Direct Shipping Shenanigans, Delaware Edition | HB 165 could open Delaware up to DtC sales, that is, unless a clause prohibiting DtC sales of wines already sold by retailers in the state doesn’t stymie things. Tablas Creek Blog

Lessons From The New Hampshire Wine Shipping Debacle | A few interesting things came out in the course of all the flurry and action over the Commission’s attempt to end retailer shipping. NAWR

IndustryUp

Opportunities and Challenges Stand Out At This Year’s Craft Brewers Conference | Nearly 15,000 brewers, their suppliers, and other industry members got together amid honky tonks and BBQ joints to talk beer and learn more about what challenges the craft beer industry face. ShipCompliant

Secrets For Growing Direct-to-Consumer Wines Sales 2018 Videocast | On May 16, 2018, SVB’s Wine Division hosted a live videocast discussion of trends in direct-to-consumer wine sales based upon findings from a survey of more than 800 responses. SVB

Can Do Attitude: Avoiding Pitfalls With Canned Wine | Winemakers discuss tips and best practices for packaging wine in the new format.

Grape And Wine Council Gets Expanded Mission | New name reflects addition of craft beverages. Traverse City Record Eagle

JustFun

The Millennial Wine Smell Test: Do Grapes Matter | Young drinkers may not care what varieties are in their beverage. Wine Spectator

The Rise of Brewery-Distillery Hybrids | As craft distilling continues to surge, some breweries are looking to spirits to boost their bottom line. SevenFifty Daily

The World’s Most Wanted Napa Wines | Think you know Napa’s most sought-after wines? Actually, you probably do. Wine-searcher.com

Is It Whisky Or Whiskey And Why It Matters | There are any number of theories to explain the alternative spelling of whiskies. The reality, however, is far more complex. Forbes

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

The post BevAlc Roundup | TTB provides excise tax reporting fixes for wineries, our review of this year’s Craft Brewers Conference, and how to succeed with canned wine appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

State Spotlight: DtC Sellers Face Unique Challenges in Louisiana

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Thu, 05/24/2018 - 20:42

When most people think of Louisiana and alcohol, they likely get visions of a Mardi Gras parade down Bourbon Street. Being steeped in the world of alcohol compliance, however, our thoughts tend more towards what are the unique regulations that affect beverage alcohol suppliers looking to sell there. And Louisiana has some pretty unique rules.

Actually, when it comes to standard three-tier distributions and sales (supplier sells to distributor sells to retailers sell to consumers), Louisiana is mostly normal. Sure there are somethings about the Pelican State that stand out — such as the famous/notorious open container laws that make those Mardi Gras parades so notable, or a bill proposed earlier this year that would have allowed people under 21 to purchase alcohol in certain situations (it was defeated in the legislature) — but for the most part, the rules regarding licensing, product registration, taxes, and trade practice restrictions are in line with most other states’ rules.

Where Louisiana gets unique — and complex — is in its regulations of direct-to-consumer (DtC) sales of wine, where a Louisiana resident makes an order that is then delivered by the seller to the resident through a common carrier. Since this is a tricky subject, we figured it would make sense to outline what are the rules, restrictions, and compliance issues that can trip up DtC sellers in Louisiana.

 

Selling DtC in Louisiana: Who, What, and How

The Who: Louisiana, like most other states, only permits the DtC sale of wine. Unlike most other states, however, Louisiana also permits out-of-state retailers to make DtC sales, not just wine producers. (Currently, only 13 states grant out-of-state retailers DtC permission).

In order to become a DtC seller, the winery or retailer must get two separate permits from the state. First, they must apply to the Louisiana Department of Revenue (DOR) for an Authority to Make Direct Shipment of Wine to Louisiana Residents (Authority). The Authority costs $150 ($1000 for retailers), and must be renewed annually by June 30th.

With the Authority in hand, the winery or retailer can then apply to the Alcohol and Tobacco Commission (ATC) for a Direct Wine Shipper Permit (DWSP). This permit costs an additional $250 ($1000 for retailers), and must be renewed annually by December 31st.

While it’s near universal for a state to require DtC sellers to register with the local DOR in order to pay taxes, Louisiana is fairly unique in turning that process into a whole separate license specifically for DtC sellers. This is the result of a 2016 rule change, in which the state determined to give the ATC greater authority over DtC sellers by granting it licensing power, but also decided to not have this new permit replace the previous DOR permit.

Anyone looking to enter the Louisiana DtC market should be aware of these required licenses.

The What: Like many other states, Louisiana requires wineries to register the brand labels of wines being sold into the state (each unique COLA attached to products that will be sold must be registered). However, under Louisiana’s DtC rules, how the brand label is registered can affect how it can be sold.

The rule is that a wine producer may not sell any wines DtC that it has already assigned for distribution through a Louisiana wholesaler. This means that wine producers must make a decision for each and every separate brand label they want to sell in Louisiana whether to do so through the state’s three-tier system or by DtC.

There is an added risk, then, for wineries who sell a lot of mixed packs of wines DtC: they must ensure that, when it comes to selling into Louisiana, each brand label in the mixed pack is not already being distributed through wholesalers in the state.

Notably, this rule does not apply to out-of-state retailers selling DtC, nor to any wines sold onsite by a wine producer (i.e. at the winery’s tasting room for delivery back to Louisiana).

For phone or internet orders, or wine club packages, this rule is very much in effect and wineries must be aware of the limit so they do not inadvertently sell a wine DtC that is also being distributed wholesale in Louisiana. This rule is mostly unique to Louisiana (Indiana prohibits DtC sellers from having any concurrent relationship with an Indiana wholesaler, and Wyoming bans the DtC sale of any wine listed with the state’s control board), and can easily catch up a wine producer with a cavalier attitude towards compliance.

The How: Once a winery or retailer is set up to begin making DtC sales to Louisiana residents (that is, they’re licensed and their wine labels have been properly registered with the state), there are further rules to follow. These rules, though, should be more familiar to wineries selling DtC in other states.

There is an annual volume limit on how much a DtC seller can ship to Louisiana residents. As written, the limit is 12 cases of 750 mL bottles per adult person per household per year. While these volume limits are fairly common, the way Louisiana structured this provision can be confusing. In practice this comes down to there being a limit of 108 liters (i.e. 12 cases of 750 mL bottles) that an individual can receive in a calendar year. Despite the “per household” phrase, each person in a household can separately purchase an amount of wine up to the annual 108 liter limit.

When making the delivery, DtC sellers must ensure they use only licensed transporters (both UPS and FedEx are properly certified by the state) who will ensure that someone over 21 years of age personally receives any package containing alcohol and presents an ID proving they are of age.

Any package containing alcohol must also be labeled to state that it contains alcohol and that someone over the age of 21 must receive it. In 2017, Louisiana changed a DtC provision to no longer require the package label to list the DtC seller’s license numbers. The DtC seller’s license numbers must still appear on the invoice included in the package, but it does not need to appear on the exterior of the package.

DtC sellers must also follow up with their DtC sales by monthly remitting both excise and sales taxes. With their excise tax filing (on the R-5696-L form), the DtC seller must include a detailed summary of each DtC order in the previous month, including the amount shipped, the brands included in each shipment, and the sizes of bottles shipped.

In addition, DtC sellers are required as a condition of their licenses to collect and remit state sales and use tax for all of their sales in Louisiana. DtC sellers with nexus in Louisiana (that is, if they have “physical presence” in the state, such as owning property or having Louisiana-based employees) will also need to collect local sales tax. (Louisiana can be a difficult state for sales tax — read this piece from ShipCompliant’s sister service, Taxify, on generally applicable sales tax regulations in Louisiana).

As in pretty much every other state that allows DtC sales, there are a number of hurdles that Louisiana requires DtC sellers to follow. Many of these are fairly standard — such as paying taxes and getting licensed. But Louisiana does also present some unique challenges, mostly when it comes to which products a wine producer can actually sell DtC.

Understanding the state’s rules can be tricky enough; having to actually comply with them can make the prospect of making DtC sales there extra daunting. If you’re facing this challenge, ask us how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help you succeed in the DtC market by staying compliant.

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance in every state by signing up for a free demo.

The post State Spotlight: DtC Sellers Face Unique Challenges in Louisiana appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

How New FDA Menu Labeling Rules May Affect Beverage Alcohol Suppliers

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 05/21/2018 - 17:25

Starting May 7, 2018, certain restaurants and similar food service providers need to comply with new menu labeling requirements designed to provide nutritional information to customers.

These requirements first came up as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act, which included measures focused on improving Americans’ overall health, not just access to insurance. But implementation has been repeatedly delayed, providing time for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to develop the regulatory framework and for industry members to prepare and offer their own comments.

Under these regulations, restaurants and similar retail food establishments that are part of a chain with 20 or more locations will need to display calorie information on their menus and also be able to provide an array of nutritional information to customers upon request. These rules will apply regardless of the chain’s ownership structure, as long as the locations all operate under the same trade name. Affected food establishments include obvious locations, like chain restaurants and fast food services, but also places like coffee shops, entertainment parks that serve food, and grocery stores.

 

What Does This Mean for Beverage Alcohol Suppliers?

These regulations are unlikely to have a direct impact on most members of the beverage alcohol supplier tier. Only actual restaurant-style facilities are required to comply with these rules, and then only if they are part of a chain with 20 or more active locations.

However, suppliers should be aware of what these menu requirements are, as this offers suppliers with the opportunity to better direct the nutritional information that will be provided. As described below, restaurants can use generic tables as their source for nutritional information.

This could unfairly bias the customer when they see no difference in nutritional content between, say, a low-sugar pinot grigio and a generic “wine.” Suppliers, then, are encouraged to control their own messaging, by providing their own, more favorable nutritional contents, rather than relying on the restaurant to plug
in any old numbers.

 

What Information Needs to be Available?

Nutritional data will need to be provided in two forms: first, the caloric content of all standard food items (i.e. food that is listed on menus for 60 or more days per year) must be clearly displayed; in addition, a full suite of nutritional information for these standard foods must be made available if a customer asks for it. These food items do include beverages.

This fuller suite must include data on such things as the total fat, trans fat, sodium, cholesterol, fiber, sugar, and protein contents of the food items.

However, as provided in the regulations, standard food items that contain an insignificant amount of 6 or more of these nutrients can use a simplified format to display the nutritional content. The simplified format must at least provide a list or table of the item’s 1) total calories, 2) total fat, 3) total carbohydrates, 4) protein, 5) sugars, and 6) calories from fat, along with any of the otherwise required nutrients that are present in more than insignificant amounts.

For beverage alcohol products, which were cited by the FDA as the paramount example of a food stuff where a simplified format is permitted, the list can be pared back even further. This may vary among products, but, for instance, wine products can get away just listing 1) calories, 2) carbohydrates, 3) sugar, and 4) sodium. Any such reduced list, though, must also be accompanied by a statement such as, “Not a significant source of Total Fat, Calories from Fat, Trans Fat, Cholesterol, Dietary Fiber, or Protein,” depending on which items were left off.

 

How do I Determine the Nutrient Content?

Under the regulations, a restaurant must have a “reasonable basis” for the nutritional information it provides, which is admittedly a pretty loose standard. In effect, this means that, when pressed, the restaurant must be able to show that it can justify arriving at those nutritional data, that they are not made up from whole cloth. The suggested means of establishing the reasonable basis includes using nutrient databases or laboratory analyses, which each come with pros and cons.

For some, using nutrient databases can be a cheap and effective means of providing the necessary data. Indeed, the USDA maintains a free, public database of nutritional data, with a wide variety of generic and branded foods, including 35 different wine varietals. In addition, members of Wine Institute can access a new nutritional calculator, available on their Members-only site. Other industry databases may be available, and it is recommended that suppliers use them when available.

Relying on a database, however, could be too unspecific for some. A database can only provide general data on what one might expect for that food item. If your product is, say, particularly light on carbohydrates, you may end up misrepresenting yourself to potential customers. Further, the database may not include the particular alcoholic beverage you’re looking for. This could be the case for the beer market; the USDA database only has only a handful of listings for generic beers.

A laboratory analysis might then be the preferred method for someone with specialized and unique products. This would provide the most specific data available, though it could be quite costly to perform: on average $350 per analysis. Either way would require a showing of the methodology used if the restaurant were to be audited by the FDA, including a listing of the lab or database used and signed statements affirming that the information is accurate.

Ultimately, it is the duty of the restaurant to ensure that it can provide nutritional information that it has a reasonable basis for believing is accurate. But presumably, restaurants will be looking for their vendors to make this information readily available, particularly for prepared items like beverage alcohol. Certainly, a supplier who has such data on hand will be appreciated by restaurants. But more so, being able to direct the nutritional data that describes their products is a much more favorable position for most suppliers to be in.

 

What’s the broader impact here?

The FDA menu labeling rules comes amid a wider movement to provide clear and accurate nutritional information on all manner of foodstuffs. For many good reasons, people are becoming more concerned with their health and the content and quality of the food they consume. Within beverage alcohol, industry groups have by and large supported such efforts to provide consumers with clear, accurate information that can better inform those consumers’ decisions, at least when those disclosures come from sound, rational public policy reasons and not out of fear mongering.

Certainly, it is preferable for the public to know what they are consuming; greater transparency should lead to improved choices. Whether these programs will actually change American consumption habits, though, will only be revealed in time.

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your brewery, winery, or distillery stay on top of compliance by requesting a free demo.

The post How New FDA Menu Labeling Rules May Affect Beverage Alcohol Suppliers appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

Opportunities and Challenges Stand Out At This Year’s Craft Brewers Conference

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Wed, 05/16/2018 - 15:55

It takes a pretty big event to stand out in a lively place like Nashville, but from April 30 to May 3 this year, the Craft Brewers Conference (CBC) took over Music City. Nearly 15,000 brewers, their suppliers, and other industry members got together amid honky tonks and BBQ joints to talk beer and learn more about what challenges the craft beer industry face.

Now in its 35th year, CBC is the single largest collection of people and businesses involved in the craft beer industry. The event is hosted by the Brewers Association (BA), and conjuncts every other year with the World Beer Cup (2018 was a competition year).

For about a week (including all the brewery tours and shows on the side), CBC provides a fantastic opportunity for the industry to come together. New entrants get to meet with the old hands who pioneered the homebrew and craft beer industries; trends and recipes get hashed over; manufacturing equipment and compliance management tools are showcased; all, generally, over a beer or three.

If there is any watchword for CBC, it is the spirit of cooperation and innovation that has carried the craft beer industry from basements and garages to the multi-billion dollar market that exists today.

 

Changing of the Guard

Back in January, Charlie Papazian, the founder of the American Homebrewers Association and a founder and past president of the BA, announced his intention to retire from the BA in 2019.

He was still an outsized presence at CBC, featured in the general session on the state of the industry, but when his upcoming retirement was mentioned, there was a sense of melancholy in the crowd. Everyone was happy for Charlie — he certainly deserves the chance to rest on his laurels — but his departure serves as a signal reminder that the craft beer market faces a moment of flux.

As a market, craft beer is still in fine form. In 2017, nearly 25 million barrels of craft beer was sold for over $26 billion, representing 12.7% and 23.4% of the total volume and value, respectively, of the entire American beer market. In a year when beer over all declined by 1.2% of volume sales, craft grew by 5%.

But this comes after years of double digit growth. This slowing down has lead to many fretful headlines predicting the end of craft beer. While merely attending CBC presented ample signs that such predictions are absurd on their face, it is apparent that the future brings challenges.

 

Growing Through Challenges

A major challenge that craft brewers face is the increasingly crowded market. With over 9,000 active Brewers Permits issued by the TTB, room for new brewers is increasingly dear — especially in mature markets like Oregon, Colorado, and Southern California. To really breakthrough, and become a larger regional brewery as many startups once dreamed of, is even more difficult.

In this regard, the future of craft beer is seemingly a victim of its past success. The early days of double-digit growth led to more entrants to the market. But now we’re seeing the results of this saturation as new breweries struggle to achieve the same growth that seemingly came so easy in decades past, particularly for those trying to sell at the regional level.

But such fears are easy to blow out of proportion. While it is true that brewery closings were up dramatically in 2017, there were still nearly 1,000 breweries that opened; there are still plenty of untapped markets to grow in; and, as Bart Watson, Chief Economist for the BA noted, focusing on the fact that 5% is a rather smaller number than 17% misses the larger point that that 5% growth happened in a much larger market than those past heady days (that is, the pie may be growing slower, but it’s a much bigger pie, so what growth there was was actually much greater volume than when the growth rate was higher).

Rather, the biggest concern that kept coming up through CBC was, how to combat the ever present challenge from Big Beer.

Following the principle that success breeds competition, large-sized, multinational brewers have been increasingly active in the last few years in approaching the craft market. This has manifested itself in several forms including acquisitions (such as Anheuser-Busch’s spree of purchases, like Breckenridge Brewery and Goose Island Brewery) and imitation (including brands like Blue Moon, which banks on a craft image while being owned by MillerCoors).

This has sparked consternation among craft brewers, who, having developed an image that sells, fear being crowded out by imitators. In response, the BA came out with an industry mark last year, which, when used on a bottle, can, other packaging or in the taproom, signals that the producer meets the BA’s definition of a craft brewer. The independent seal was nearly ubiquitous at CBC, with the BA encouraging its use as a means to stand apart to consumers in the ever-growing crowded beer market.

While these challenges signal that the “easy” days of craft beer may be going away, they also present a different picture: the craft beer market is facing a moment of maturity. It’s no longer a small collection of die hards, working from a devoted urge to make American beer great, but a proper industry now having to deal with the consequences of its own success.

 

Wither Craft Beer?

The crowds at this year’s CBC quickly disabuse any notion that the craft beer market is at any real risk of going away. It is abundantly clear that people want great beer, and that great beer can be made profitably. While the past days of rocketing growth may be gone, the craft market continues to grow at a clip that other industries would do terrible things for. The rise of acquisitions and imitations speaks to that success.

This is not to say that the craft market of the future will be much like what it was in years past — or even as it is today. As with everything, the only constant is change. Positively the craft market seems well aware that change is in the air, and is doing all it can to prepare for that change. This could mean thousands of small brewers focused only on local markets; or possibly, large, nationwide coalitions of brewers (think CANarchy) banding together to sell each others’ beers. Both models were discussed at length at CBC. But, then, of course, some third way could always develop in the next few years.

In the end, among all the consternation and speculating, perhaps the best advice from CBC is Charlie Papazian’s own catch phrase, “Relax. Don’t worry. Have a homebrew.”

 

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your brewery stay on top of compliance by requesting a free demo.

The post Opportunities and Challenges Stand Out At This Year’s Craft Brewers Conference appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

BevAlc Roundup | New Hampshire denies retailers DtC licenses, label statement accuracy matters, and don’t overlook Colorado wine

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 05/14/2018 - 11:22

We’re now only a couple weeks away from the annual GCS: Wine Summit (which many of you may have known as the DIRECT conference); checkout the fantastic lineup of speakers and presentations we have in store below, and if you haven’t registered do so now! For the rest of this week’s roundup, a bill containing new DtC rules (along with a lot else) fails to pass in Alaska, why Gen Xers, not Millennials, should get the marketing love, and fermented tree bark could be a thing soon.

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the ShipCompliant/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

 

ShipCompliant Events

GCS: Wine Summit, our annual wine industry conference is coming up! This year, we’ll be hosting the event at the Napa Valley Marriott on May 31, with panels on the state of DtC wine sales and how to expand your three-tier distribution footprint. Sign up here!

GCS: Wine Summit: Speakers, Sessions, and Keynotes A preview of what you can anticipate at the upcoming GCS: Wine Summit. Register today!

LegislativeUpdate

TTB Newsletter | Top stories include Brewers Bootcamp from the Craft Brewers Conference have been posted and a preview of Formulas Online 2.7. TTB

Liquor Commission Decried By Group For “Gangster Tactics” Over Barring Mail-Order Wine Shipments to NH Customers | Citing a statutory ability to “protect its revenue,” the New Hampshire Liquor COmmission has denied permits for brick-and-mortar retailers shipping wine to customers in New Hampshire, a move the National Association of Wine Retailers calls “gangster tactics.” Union Leader

Small Wineries Hoping For Tax Cuts Face Massive Tax Hikes Instead | Last year’s big tax bill included excise-tax cuts for American wineries, but an error means many now face a potential tax hike. Wine Spectator

Bill To Revise Alaska Alcohol Laws Dies In Dispute Between Bars, Brewers | A wide-ranging overhaul of the state’s alcohol laws essentially died Thursday when its author withdrew it from committee following public outcry over a House amendment that would have cut brewery and distillery serving sized by one-third. News Miner

Understanding The Legal Issues Around Cannabis-Infused Alcoholic Drinks | An industry lawyer discusses what brands need to know about using cannabis, CBD, THC, and hemp derivatives. SevenFifty Daily

IndustryUp

The Experts Say Wine Marketing Should Focus On Generation X | The real prize for wine may be the generation in between, so-called Generation X, those in their 40s and 50s. Forbes

Concern Over Accurate Labeling Grows | US trade agencies and marketers says consumer education depends on more precise labels. Wine-Searcher.com

Wine Experts Warn Of Growing Anti-Alcohol Sentiment And Aging Boomers | Concerns for the future marked industry insights coming from the North Bay Business Journal’s 18th annual Wine Industry Conference. North Bay Business Journal

Wait For It | When done right, limited releases can lead to an enthusiastic line outside your door — but there are pitfalls. Spirited

JustFun

Four Design-Driven Trends Sweeping The Adult Beverage Category | In an environment with an ever growing roster of choice, alcoholic beverage manufacturers are steadily being reminded that appearances matter. Nielsen

Colorado Is Home To Some Of The Country’s Best Wines | Parts of the terrain are even said to resemble Provence. Westword

The Bottle That Changed My Life | Somms and beverage directors share their most revelatory wine moments. SevenFifty Daily

Japanese Scientists Can Make Alcohol From Wood | With an alcoholic strength similar to the popular rice-wine sake, the wood-based booze could hit shelves within three years. Sky News

Exploring The Diverse Range Of New Gins | Distillers discuss their growing portfolios–and their motivations for producing multiple styles. SevenFifty Daily

Find out how ShipCompliant by Sovos can help your business stay on top of compliance by signing up for a free demo.

 

 

The post BevAlc Roundup | New Hampshire denies retailers DtC licenses, label statement accuracy matters, and don’t overlook Colorado wine appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

Direct-to-Consumer Wine Shipping: Zinfandel and Rosé on the rise, while Red Blends underperform their peers

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 05/07/2018 - 17:45

In January, we released the 2018 Direct-to-Consumer Wine Shipping Report, which offers an exclusive deep dive into the direct-to-consumer (DtC) wine shipping channel with our partners Wines & Vines. The report is produced using Wines & Vines’ algorithm, which extrapolates data from the extensive ShipCompliant by Sovos transaction library.

This article will focus on key trends we found in analyzing DtC wine shipping data by wine type, or varietal. We’ll run through the numbers for each of the following varietals: Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Red Blends, Chardonnay, Zinfandel, Rosé, and Syrah.

Cabernet and Pinot remain the dominant forces

Cabernet Sauvignon has historically dominated the DtC wine shipping channel, and 2017 was no exception. Cabernets accounted for 29.3 percent of the value of all DtC wine shipments, despite only making up 16 percent of the off-premise retail market. However, the big news last year was that Pinot Noir overtook Red Blends as the second-most valuable wine in the DtC sector, at a healthy 16.2 percent. This is likely a result of the 15.6 percent growth in Pinot shipments, which, while healthy, is perhaps not as noteworthy as another rising varietal. But more on that later.

Cabernet was also saw growth last year, with a 17.9 percent increase in shipment volume. This is the second-largest increase of any varietal in 2017, and it only served to further distance this seemingly omni-popular wine from its already-trailing peers. There are three certainties in life: Death, taxes, and cabernet domination of the DtC wine shipping channel.

 

Zinfandel stole the show in 2017

Scratch that last statement in the previous paragraph. Cabernet has a new challenger for the DtC crown!

…well, maybe that’s a little premature. Zinfandel exploded in the DtC market last year, and while we don’t yet know if the growth is sustainable, we do know this: It’s downright impressive. Zinfandel shipments increased by 29.4 percent and now accounts for 6.3 percent of the total DtC market despite not making the top five in off-premise retail shipments. For some reason or another, Zinfandel producers have managed to effectively gain ground on the market via the DtC channel, and we applaud their efforts. Accordingly, the value of all Zinfandel shipments is up 34.5 percent year-over-year.

Zinfandels may not challenge Cabernet for the top spot in this category any time soon, but they certainly appear to be on the rise and ready to overtake some of the other more popular varietals, like Chardonnay.

 

Red Blends are seemingly losing some steam

On a slightly more dour note, ever-popular Red Blends may be losing some of their popularity. Remember when we said Pinot Noir had overtaken Red Blends in the DtC channel? That’s because Red Blends saw the least growth of any of the most popular wines, at 7.22 percent. Even modest growth can only be viewed as positive, but producers of Red Blends may find themselves discouraged that their products are not growing as quickly as others in the DtC space, like Zinfandel, Pinot Noir, and, of course, Cabernet.

With all that said, Red Blends still accounted for 14.4 percent of all shipments in the market, as well as 15.6 percent of the total value of the channel. These are by no means insignificant figures, and indicate that Red Blend producers have little to fear as far as overall stability is concerned. A strong rebound in 2018 would likely quell any remaining concerns.

 

Rosé has seen impressive organic growth

Everyone’s favorite pink drink is officially on the rise! Rosé shipments increased by an astounding 57.8 percent last year, but what’s possibly even more impressive is that there was no corresponding dip in value, as we often see when larger quantities of wine are shipped. Instead, Rosé’s value actually increased even more than its volume of shipments, at 58.9 percent. So, should we begin genuflecting before our new Rosé overlords?

The short answer: Probably not. Despite all this incredible growth, Rosé wines only account for 3.1 percent of all DtC shipments and a mere 1.5 percent of the total value. This is definitely a varietal to monitor in the coming years, but it is not likely to displace any of the firmly-entrenched market leaders in the foreseeable future.

 

Keep an eye on Syrah

Another historically overlooked wine quietly put together a very strong performance in 2017. Syrah shipments increased 18.7 percent, while the value grew a more modest but still respectable 11.7 percent. Like Rosé, this varietal accounts for a small portion of all shipments (3 percent) and overall value (2.5 percent) in the DtC wine shipping channel. However, Syrah is clearly growing in popularity and its producers deserve to have their efforts recognized. Well done, everyone!

 

Want to learn more about trends in the direct-to-consumer shipping channel? Download the full 2018 Direct-to-Consumer Wine Shipping Report.

 

The post Direct-to-Consumer Wine Shipping: Zinfandel and Rosé on the rise, while Red Blends underperform their peers appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

2018 ShipCompliant Wine Summit: Speakers, Sessions, and Keynotes

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Thu, 05/03/2018 - 09:29

The 2018 ShipCompliant Wine Summit is approaching fast! This is the 13th edition of our annual summit, which this year has two separate breakout focuses for attendees: 3-Tier and Direct to Consumer shipping. Meanwhile, our keynotes will focus heavily on cutting-edge data utilization and the state of the industry.

If you haven’t already registered for the conference, which will take place May 31 at the Napa Valley Marriott in Napa, California, we encourage you to do so as soon as possible to ensure your spot. You won’t want to miss out on our premier user conference with keynotes from industry experts, exciting breakout sessions, our exhibition hall with our sponsors and partners from the industry, a big reception, and plenty of networking time.

Our breakout sessions will focus on industry trends like consumer experience, expanding your footprint, and how to stay on top of increasingly challenging compliance issues and scrutiny. Here are some brief overviews of the sessions for 3-Tier and DtC Shipping:

 

3-Tier Breakouts:

Top Ways to Optimize Your Time to Market: Jillyan Ramos of Delicato Family Vineyards, Sara Schorske of Compliance Service of America (CSA), and Lauren Whitney of Sovos will walk you through the best strategies to get your products to market most quickly and efficiently.

How to Expand Your Footprint: John Hinman of Hinman & Carmichael, Gordon Waggoner of Acumen, and our own Liz Yount from Sovos will demonstrate how you can expand your winery’s footprint in a crowded market.

 

DtC Wine Shipping Breakouts:

Top Ways to Stay Compliant in an Era of Increased Scrutiny: Matt Botting of the California ABC, Alex Heckathorn of CSA, Carole Peterson of Wente Vineyards, and Sovos’ infamous Alex Koral will discuss the best ways wineries can keep up with ever-changing regulatory changes and complex state rules to ensure they maintain compliance.

How to Extend Your Tasting Room Culture Into the Digital World: Andrea Gonzalez from Treasury Wine Estates, Sandra Hess from DtC Wine Workshops, Andrew Kamphuis from Commerce7, and Curry Wilson from Sovos will break down strategies wineries are using to become more immersed in the digital world using their tasting rooms as a way to connect with consumers.

 

Keynotes:

Utilizing Data to Grow Your Business: Danny Brager of Nielsen and Larry Cormier, General Manager of ShipCompliant by Sovos, will discuss how data is transforming and disrupting the wine industry, as well as how wineries can take advantage of this trend and leverage it to spur growth.

Annual State of the Wine Industry: The Wine Institute’s Steve Gross will send us off on a high note, as he performs a deep dive into the status of the industry and what we can all expect to see in the coming months and years.

Don’t miss out – register for the 2018 ShipCompliant Wine Summit today!

 

The post 2018 ShipCompliant Wine Summit: Speakers, Sessions, and Keynotes appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

BevAlc Roundup | DtC sales grow as global wine production dips, Canada chooses not to open to DtC, and mead makes a 1,000-year comeback

Ship Compliant Wine Blog - Mon, 04/30/2018 - 16:12

April showers are bringing May grapes and hops and barley and rye and all the other budding plants that bring us joy! This week’s roundup showcases a few posts from the ShipCompliant blog you may have missed, including a look at which regions drove the DtC market in 2017 and new DtC rules coming into effect in Kentucky. That and why global wine production dropped significantly in 2017, and how advancements in gene therapy could help make more resistant, tastier crops.

Stay up to date with the latest trends in the DtC wine market with the ShipCompliant/Wines & Vines 2018 DtC Report. Make sure to download your copy here!

 

ShipCompliant Events

GCS: Wine Summit, our annual wine industry conference is coming up! This year, we’ll be hosting the event at the Napa Valley Marriott on May 31, with panels on the state of DtC wine sales and how to expand your three-tier distribution footprint. Sign up here!

LegislativeUpdate

TTB Newsletter | Top stories include an upcoming webinar about whisky, and two long-time TTB employees are retiring. TTB

New DtC Rules In Kentucky For Wineries and Distilleries | While the bill appears to be a big win for the Bluegrass State’s bourbon industry, it is as yet unclear what all effects the new rules will have on the DtC market. ShipCompliant

Pay-to-Play Schemes Keep TTB Busy | How to stay out of trouble in the US wine sales business. Wine-searcher.com

Canadian Supreme Court Upholds Restrictions on Interprovincial Transportation of Alcohol | The Supreme Court of Canada issued a ruling in a highly anticipated case affecting the movement of alcohol across provincial borders, which was forecast by some as a potential Granholm moment for the nation. ShipCompliant

Florida Clarifies Permissibility of Delivery by Third Party Providers | Earlier this month, Florida legislature passed a bill clarifying that alcohol vendors, including DtC shippers, can, in fact, contract with common carriers to fulfill their deliveries. Alcohol.law

IndustryUp

DtC Shipping: Regional Focus | In 2017, Napa overcame adversity, while Sonoma and Oregon drove growth in the DtC channel. ShipCompliant

Global Wine Output Sinks To A 60-Year Low | Poor weather conditions in the European Union has caused global wine output to fall to its lowest level in 60 years. Business Insider

Northwest Wines Drive Strong Sales | Oregon and Washington wines claiming larger shares of off-premise and DtC sales. Wines&Vines

JustFun

Using CRISPR On Grapes | New technologies like gene editing old promise form improving the fruit’s resistance to disease. SevenFifty Daily

How Craft Brewers Are Shaping the Spirits Industry | The curious minds behind the craft beer revolution are seeking new adventures, and you’re about to reap the benefits. Food & Wine

Mead Makers Bring Old Beverage Into New Era | Everything old is new again, and in the case of mead – the ancient fermented honey beverage – makers are partying like it’s 1999…B.C. SF Gate

The Rise Of Unfiltered Spirits | Distillers discuss the effects of chill filtering on clarity — and flavor. SevenFifty Daily

The post BevAlc Roundup | DtC sales grow as global wine production dips, Canada chooses not to open to DtC, and mead makes a 1,000-year comeback appeared first on ShipCompliant | The software leader of the beverage alcohol industry.

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